The Creation of a Bronze 

 

Pohutukawa bronze relief 

 

Here is how I created "Pohutukawa":

First the composition for the piece had to be worked out.


Pohutukawa at Wenderholm 75

Wenderholm Regional Park, inspiration for the bronze 


Pencil sketch for Pohutukawa 75

My sketched composition 

 

The drawing was scaled up in the computer to the finished size, then traced onto the prepared working surface.

The sculpting for "Pohutukawa" was done mostly in wax built over a wooden support. This support was in order to keep the overall thickness of bronze to less than 4mm and light enough to fix to the wall.

 

Pohutukawa wax trunk section 75

The work beginning to take shape

 

Pohutukawa wax completed 75

The completed wax sculpture, ready to take to the foundry 

 

When the wax work was complete it was taken over by foundry staff who took it from a wax form to a fully finished bronze.

I had fashioned "Pohutukawa" in two manageable sections. Branch-like solid wax rods, or sprues, were attached to strategic points of both pieces. Once the wax was burnt from the mould, these sprues would provide the tunnels through which the bronze could flow as it was poured in.

The sections were then ready for the mould-making and were dipped into a fine ceramic slurry. This hardened onto the wax like an egg shell, recording every detail. The two moulds were built up through a series of increasingly coarser layers before being placed in a kiln for burning out the wax.

 

Wax being burnt out of mould 75

Burning wax out of ceramic shell sections in a kiln

 

Pohutukawa pouring the bronze 75

The most dramatic and spectacular stage of the whole process - the pour

 

With the ceramic moulds set in sand boxes, expert hands controlled the flow of the 1300 degree molten bronze through the maze of cavities, transforming all the work to date into a durable piece of fine art.

Once the bronze had cooled and hardened, the sections were broken out of their moulds. With the sprues cut off, the sections were fixed together using bronze welding rods and the sculpture was ready for its finishing metal work or fettling.

Finally the patina was applied to the sculpture. Here the bronze was evenly heated with a torch and chemicals sprayed onto the bronze surface, causing a reaction which gave the work the desired colour.

Completed, the newly created bronze was ready for display.

 

Pohutukawa bronze on wall 75

 

 

 

 

Pohutukawa bronze relief

 

"Pohutukawa"

Bronze Relief
Measures 1220mm x 686mm
(4ft x 2ft 3in)
 
Private collection: M & S Smith
 
(Relief sculpture: Not fully in the round. Generally set against a flat background
or evolving out of a flat surface and creating the impression of depth and perspective.)
 
 
The sculpture "Pohutukawa" was commissioned by a couple who are collectors of my work. They had recently completed their beautiful new home and had a wall in need of the right piece of art; one that would suit both their interests and their decor.
 
Pohutukawa bronze on wall 75
 
 
After some conversation, and getting the feel of the house and grounds for a while, the idea for the piece suddenly came to mind. When I described it my client smiled and I knew I had hit upon the right concept.
 
With a little more discussion we had agreement to proceed and I launched into creating the new work. As this was a "one-off" original, I took shots of the work at various stages of development. When it came time to send the finished work to the foundry for casting, I asked them too if they would supply me with a couple of photos to show the rest of the process.
 
To see the work as it progressed, click here for "The Creation of a Bronze".
 
Brian Moore
PO Box 527
Orewa 0946
New Zealand

Phone: 09 420 3308

International calls: +64 9 420 3308
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 
 
 

 

freedive

 

"Free Dive"

Oil on canvas

Measures: 1500mm x 1000mm ( 59in x 39 3/8 in )

Private collection: J. Ross

 

"Free Dive" is an underwater study of a free diver approaching a meatball of bait fish to target the yellowfin tuna that are starting to arrive. Gannets can be seen diving from the surface and, over to the right behind the meatball, the silhouette of a cruising shark can just be made out.

 
Brian Moore
PO Box 527
Orewa 0946
New Zealand

Phone: 09 420 3308

International calls: +64 9 420 3308
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

 

 

 

Ripplesinframe

 

"Ripples"

Dimensions: 813mm x 584mm
32in x 23in

Private collection: D. and C. Dennis


" Ripples " is an oil on canvas commissioned by a local farmer friend. He wanted a study of an aspect of his farm and left the choice to me. The feature I found inspiring was this tranquil spot created by a dam on a small stream.

I wanted a focal point and so, using a borrowed duck decoy and with the help of my daughter Vanessa gently pulling it across the pond on a length of fishing line, at just the right speed, we got the illusion of a duck swimming through the still water creating the ripples and completing the composition.

 

Brian Moore
PO Box 527
Orewa 0946
New Zealand

Phone: 09 420 3308

International calls: +64 9 420 3308
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 
 

 

 

Firebird

 

"Firebird"

Oil on canvas

651mm x 522mm

Private collection: L. Churchill


A while ago Judith and I went over to spend Christmas with friends of ours in L A. I had a purpose in mind, as part of the trip, to go into a place called Monument Valley. The geographical features of this area are very interesting and are formed through thousands of years of natural erosion by wind and water. Located in Utah, on Navajo land, Monument Valley was made famous by John Wayne in his early Westerns. There is a museum, at the nearby Goulding's Lodge where we stayed, which has photos and artefacts from those early black and white movies.

Places like these fascinate me because they have such vast and prehistoric qualities about them, and so we were up before the dawn in the high desert winter air to get the shots which form the basis of this painting.

The person who commissioned this painting is a long-term collector of my work. I recalled him telling me of a photo he had seen, of a painting which hung in a Sydney art gallery, and which for years had inspired him to get something similar done for himself. It was of a Phoenix rising and emerging from the clouds with the sun shining through from behind. I have always been interested in doing some surreal work, so I asked him if he would be interested in commissioning my own composition of the idea. Because the photo for the original inspiration had been mislaid at the time, I had not seen what this painting actually looked like and so painted mine both from the client's description and my own interpretation. In Mr. Churchill's own words he is "more than happy" with the result.

Brian Moore
PO Box 527
Orewa 0946
New Zealand

Phone: 09 420 3308

International calls: +64 9 420 3308
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.